Best Stillwater Fly Fishing Shop Gears

Best Stillwater Fly Fishing Shop Gears


A quick visit to any stillwater fly fishing shop will show you that you don't have to be in one of those huge gurgling rivers, filled with 40  pound fishes, to fly fish. These Stillwater fly fishing shops are equipped with gear for smaller, stiller waters so you don't have to worry about your fly getting trapped in shrouds if you cast backward. Sure it sucks to have limited fishing space, but what are you going to do if you don't have a boat? Not fly fish? No. Fly fishing's too therapeutic to give up on the first sight of challenge.      

In fact, if ice removal boats were a thing, anglers would volunteer to take them out at the first sight of spring, if only to cure themselves from months of winter induced cabin fever. That's how committed a passionate angler is. Stillwater fly fishing shops are brimming with accessories specifically designed to overcome the constraints of fly fishing on lakes, marshes and ponds.      

Make no mistake though, most of these fly fishing gear work just fine in non-stillwater, so it's like getting an all-inclusive equipment. Stores come equipped with everything from books and DVDs that teach stillwater techniques, stillwater flies that are compatible with the most likely rocky or grassy shores you'll be fishing in, as well as hooks and gifts for the fly fishing inclined. Here's a brief guide on how your stillwater gear should be.         

Gears Available in Stillwater Fly Fishing Shops     

 - Stillwater Fly Rods: if you'll be fly fishing from the shores, you'll want a rod with a good reach, along the lines of 8 to 10 ft, moderate to fast action. Its weight will depend on the species and size you're scouting for.   

 - Stillwater Fly Fishing Reel: unless you're a hardcore angler fly fishing in the middle of a still lake, pretty much any disc drag reel will do, so you have leeway to select whatever you want.    

- Waders: stillwater fly fishing shops are equipped with waders to allow you to cover otherwise unreachable areas, especially if you're not interested in detangling flies from shore weeds.    

- Boats: either pontoon style boats or float tubes give you more reach than waders. They're a bit more difficult to transport if you live far from the water, but you should check out the stillwater fly fishing shop closest to you as they may have some for rent.    

- Polarized Glasses: because of the lack of current, it can be difficult to sight fishes, unless you know where they reside (trouts love coverage, so check rocks and weeds for them). Polarized glasses will improve your sight.   

 - Stillwater Flies: once you know what the fish you're hunting for feeds on, it's easier to get flies that mimic their appearance. Trouts feed on larger prey, and love abusing their prey, so bigger flies are better.    

Staring at stillwater can be pretty calming, which is rewarding in and of itself. But going home with a good game's even better, so checkout stillwater fly fishing shops and ensure you have the right gear.


Tags: Stillwater Fly Fishing Shop


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